Brewing Success: The Early Years Of American Craft Beer

The American brewing landscape started to take shape during the 1970s, when beer traditions and styles from other countries and imported drinks were losing ground in the market. Marketing campaigns at that time shifted Americans’ preference to low calorie light beer.

Corn-2Image source: blog.virginia.org

While the beer industry was effectively being remolded, a grassroots home brewing culture was emerging. What first started as a hobby to experience the said beer tradition and styles from across the world thrived to become what is now the craft brewery or microbrewery industry.

cropped-frontpageImage source: britman.riversideinnovationcentre.co.uk

It all started in 1965, when Fritz Maytag purchased and revived Anchor Brewing Company. He maintained the original beer traditions that consumers loved for its uniqueness. Several beer enthusiasts started to follow suit by starting their own breweries with the intent of introducing more beer flavors and styles to the public.

Craft brewing experienced a renaissance in the mid-70s when the New Albion Brewery in California was established. Though the company had to close after just six years, its operation inspired hundreds of home brewers.

By 1980s, the quality of craft beers continued to improve, gaining even more popularity and becoming the choice drink of a larger share of consumers. Even with challenging market conditions, the foundation was set for more than 2,500 craft breweries now in the country.

Adam Quirk is a co-founder of Cardinal Spirits, an Indiana craft distillery that is founded on a passion for American manufacturing and excellent spirits. Read more about craft brewery by visiting this website.

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