Malting our way to the finest spirits

Malt is a central ingredient in making some of the finest spirits in distilleries across the world. Without it, we’d all probably be suffering from some of the most uneventful celebrations and cheers, if we’d be having them at all.

Malting is the process of converting raw grains into malt. Essentially, malt is germinated cereal grains that are activated by soaking in water. Later in the process, the germination is halted by means of aeration, or further drying with hot air.

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Image source: ecuadortimes.net

Malting grains develops the enzymes required for modifying the grain’s starches into various types of sugar, including sugar alcohols. This is why alcohols that result from malting tend to have a sweet taste. Timing is also key in producing the different types of fermentable sugars. Virtually any stage of the process has a unique yield.

Malted grain is utilized in malting beer, whiskey, and other alcoholic drinks. Essentially, a particular region’s produce is dependent on the endemic local farm produce that can come from it. Arguably, spirits are truly authentic if these are made from the best ingredients coming from a particular locale.

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Image source: farminguk.com

Today, the standard in the craft distilling industry is that production adheres to the authentic appeal that can only be provided by a chosen place’s naturally grown ingredients, malt most of all. This is the truly the only way to create the finest spirits in craft distilling.

A former operative a tech startup, Adam Quirk co-founded Cardinal Spirits, a distillery which is well-known for producing from locally available ingredients. Learn more about wines and spirits here.

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